1. Japanese Exhibition Flyer: Akarui Hansen. Osawa Yudai. 2014
  2. Japanese Exhibition Poster: The Passion and Calm of the Avant-Garde. Satoshi Kondo / Asatte. 2014
  3. Japanese Exhibition Poster: Tsutsumu: Traditional Japanese Packaging. Direction Q. 2011
  4. Japanese Poster: National Book Fair. Shunsuke Sato. 2013
  5. Japanese Poster: Bread in Yokohama. Tomoyo Okubo. 2013
  6. Japanese Exhibition Poster: Takahashi Hiroko: Overturning Fixed Ideas and Provoking New Ways of Thinking. 2013
  7. Japanese Advertising: Marunouchi Gyoko Marché. 2014
  8. Japanese Exhibition Flyer: High School Week. Ryotaro Sasame / Kowase Moriyasu. 2013
  9. Gurafiku Interview with Kyoorius Magazine of India

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    Gurafiku was recently interviewed by Payal Khandelwal for the India-based creative culture magazine, Kyoorius.

    What was your vision behind launching Gurafiku in the first place?   

    Gurafiku started as a place for me to collect and share all the research I was doing related to Japanese graphic design. In 2010, I studied design and communications in Japan and Gurafiku was something I used to help prepare for my studies. Currently, the site functions as a visual archive, cataloging works of Japanese designers from the 1800s to the present.

    During my research, I found that it can be difficult at times to find in-depth information on Japanese design, especially for those not familiar with the language. Gurafiku seeks out the work of Japanese graphic designers, identifying who created it and when, organizing everything by decade and format. The goal is to provide a very accessible and visual way of exploring Japanese graphic design throughout history.

    Additionally, even during my education as a designer, I noticed that very rarely were Japanese designers mentioned in our design history courses. More often then not, the topics revolved around the work of designers from the US and Europe. Through my own research, I ended up coming across designers like Yusaku Kamekura and Ikko Tanaka and found inspiration in the work they were doing. Seeing design from other countries and in other languages made me want to better understand the very nature of communication, culture, and expression, all things at he heart of graphic design. I would like to see more of these different histories and practices incorporated in the telling of design history.

    Read more at kyoorius.com.

  10. Japanese Publication: Okutabi. 2013